Hip

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint formed where the rounded end of the thighbone (femur) fits into a cup-shaped socket (acetabulum) in the pelvis. The acetabulum is ringed by strong fibrocartilage called the labrum that creates a tight seal and helps to provide stability to the joint. Ligaments surround the joint and hold it together. Tendons over the ligaments attach muscles in the buttocks, thighs, and pelvis to the bones. These muscles control hip movement.

Common Injuries that occur to the hip are fractures, arthritis, and overuse injuries such as bursitis.

Broken Hip/ Hip Fracture

A hip fracture is a break in the upper quarter of the femur (thigh) bone. Hip fractures most commonly occur from a fall or a direct blow to the side of the hip. A broken hip is a serious condition at any age. Complications associate with a broken hip can be life-threatening. A broken hip almost always requires surgery.

Symptoms:

  • Severe pain in the hip or lower groin area
  • Inability to walk, put pressure on, or rotate the affected hip and leg;
  • Inflammation or bruising of the hip
  • The affected leg is shorter than the unaffected leg

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • A thorough examination which includes diagnostic procedures such as X-ray, MRI.
Arthritis

Osteoarthritis, also commonly called degenerative joint disease, it is the most common form of arthritis, and affects more than 20 million Americans. The disease gradually wears away the protective covering of the joint ends (articular cartilage). Once the cartilage wears away, it typically does not regenerate, leaving the individual with painful bone on bone contact.

Symptoms:

  • Pain that increases with vigorous activity in groin or thigh that radiates to buttocks or knee
  • Increased joint pain with rainy weather
  • Impaired ability to walk, may limp
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Stiffness in the hip joint making it difficult to walk or bend
  • Locking or sticking of the joint
  • Grinding noise (crepitus) during movement.

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • A¬†thorough examination which includes a range of motion, sensitivity tests, gait analysis, palpation, X-rays, an MRI, a CT scan, and bone scan in order to determine proper non-operative or operative treatment.
Overuse Injuries (such as Bursitis):

Occurs from repeating the same activity. The repeated activity stresses the hip joint and often causes irritation.

Symptoms:

  • Irritation of the large sac that separates the hipbones from the muscles and tendons of the thighs and buttocks which are referred to as trochanteric bursitis, and irritation of the tendons in the hip causing tendinitis

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • Bursitis and overuse injuries can often be treated with a change in physical activity or exertion of that particular joint in conjunction with closely monitored physical therapy and stretching exercises.