Knee

Three bones meet to form the knee joint: femur, tibia, and patella. Cartilage is the shock absorber between the femur and tibia. Ligaments connect bones to other bones to hold them together and keep the knee stable.

Fractures

Many fractures around the knee are caused by high-energy trauma, such as falls from significant heights and motor vehicle collisions.

Symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Unable to weight bear
  • Tenderness

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • Provider examination
  • Nerve function test
  • X-rays
  • MRI
  • CT
Ligament Tears

Any direct contact to the knee or hard muscle contraction such as changing direction rapidly while running can injure knee ligaments. Common ligament tears include medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear which causes pain on the inside of the knee or a lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tear which causes pain on the outside of the knee.

Symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Instability

Diagnostic Procedures:

Meniscus Tear

The cartilage between the thighbone and shinbone are called meniscus.  Meniscal tears may occur as a result of arthritis or aging or an awkward twist with movement.

Symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Catching or locking
  • “Giving away”
  • Limited range of motion

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • Provider Examination including the McMurray’s test
  • X-rays
  • MRI
Arthritis

Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of the joints.The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Symptoms:

  • Stiffness
  • A difficulty with bending and straightening
  • Pain with activity
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Locking
  • Grinding noise
  • Weakness

Diagnostic Procedures:

  • Provider Examination
  • Gait analysis
  • X-rays
  • CT